The origins of the game of golf have been hotly debated by scholars and sportsmen for many centuries. Some trace it to a game played in the Netherlands in the 1290s, while others believe it was first played in China during the Song Dynasty in the 1100s. Most authorities, agree, however, that golf as it was played today was invented in Scotland in the 1300s. Modern golf courses offer a combination of exercise and athletic competition in serene, well-kept surroundings and are an ideal place to discuss business on a casual level. As the president and founder of Titanium Builders, Touraj Jason Vedadi has a good deal of experience in both golfing and in the business world. Here are three guidelines experienced golfers like Touraj Vedadi follow on mixing business with pleasure on the golf course.

The Game Comes First

Touraj Vedadi is a talented golfer and has snagged several championships on the amateur circuit in recent years. His experience on the links has served him well in the business world and has allowed him to build relationships with a number of influential figures in the construction and supply industries. According to golfers like Vedadi, the most important rule when mixing golf and business is to put the game first and discuss business as a secondary activity. Engaging in prolonged discussions should take a backseat to continuing the game at a reasonable pace. This can help avoid game delays and players’ annoyance and can create a more relaxed atmosphere for the entire game.

Pick the Right Moment

It can be difficult to determine the perfect moment to bring up business issues during a golf game. Raising the topic too soon can create an undesirable appearance of eagerness; delaying too long may allow the opportunity to slip away. Finding the right time to discuss business with a potential client or associate requires the ability to read verbal and nonverbal cues effectively. Golfers like Touraj Vedadi suggests waiting for a natural break in the conversation and to segue into the topic carefully. Above all, avoid talking through your colleague’s backswing.

Create Mutually Beneficial Proposals

Deciding what to discuss is just as important as determining when to discuss it. One fatal mistake that many business professionals make is to consider only their own interests when developing a proposal or making a pitch to one of their golfing companions. The best business agreements offer benefits to all parties to the proposal. For example, when seeking a special accommodation from a vendor or supplier, it is wise to build in incentives that provide real and measurable benefits to that company or individual. This increases the chance of success in pitching the proposal and ensures that it is treated with the consideration it deserves on the golf course and in the boardroom.

Touraj Vedadi has enjoyed exceptional success in both his amateur golf career and in his business dealings. His construction firm is widely regarded as one of the most reputable and reliable building companies in the northwest and is rapidly expanding to other areas of the United States. Vedadi conducts quite a bit of business on the golf course and is considered an authority in both business and in golfing pursuits.

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Dean Saliba is a freelance writer, professional blogger, media enthusiast, dirty football player and huge professional wrestling fan who covers a wide range of subjects and niches including, making money online, traffic generating, pro wrestling, blog reviews, football, how-to guides, music, internet marketing and more.